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  1. Trying out 'cram'

    I desperately need something to run and test things at the command line, both for course documentation (think "doctest" but with shell prompts) and for script testing (as part of scientific pipelines). At the 2011 testing-in-python BoF, Augie showed us cram, which is the mercurial project's internal test code ripped …

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  2. What's with the goat?

    A new meme was born at PyCon 2010: The Testing Goat.

    Or, "Be Stubborn. Obey the Goat."

    The goat actually emerged from the Testing In Python Birds of a Feather session at PyCon, where Terry Peppers used slides full of goat in his introduction. This was apparently an overreaction to …

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  3. Software testing in science

    As part of a CiSE submission I'm working on, I interviewed the lead developer on a scientific software package today. This software package is mainly used for evolutionary studies, and has a small but devoted following - ~6 developers and ~12 users locally, plus a few dozen users outside of MSU …

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  4. Twill lives!

    One of the advantages of this year's PyCon was that it was (again) held in Chicago, the home town of Leapfrog Online. Since they use twill quite a bit, and were bothered by some of the poor design decisions and bugginess, they were keen to get together with me to …

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  5. Pursuing simplicity

    John Gall apparently said:

    A complex system that works is invariably found to have evolved from a simple system that worked. The inverse proposition also appears to be true: A complex system designed from scratch never works and cannot be made to work. You have to start over, beginning with …
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  6. Google Highly Open Participaton Contest -- another notch in the source code!

    Pavel Vinogradov <fastnix> has been keeping me updated on an issue he discovered while testing TCMalloc with Python as a Google Highly Open Participation (GHOP) task, task 105.

    Briefly, Pavel discovered a situation in which replacing the Python memory allocator with TCMalloc resulted in really bad performance. The latest is …

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  7. Building test fixtures for PostgreSQL

    I'm having trouble with some tests of a PostgreSQL-based system. Briefly, I have a set of functional tests that

    • create a new database
    • populate it with a data model
    • run a Web server (in-process)
    • test the integrated Web server - database functionality

    The tests are now slow enough that I'm averse …

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  8. Writing Code That Doesn't Suck

    Note: this is ultimately intended for the biology-in-python Wiki at http://bio.scipy.org/. I will release it under a CC license, so please feel free to use it for your own site! --titus

    Here are some prescriptions for writing Python code that other Python programmers will find more usable …

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  9. Seen on the agile-testing list

    Recently seen on a list (with a nasty archival system that I don't want to link to):

    "Don't write a test plan. Instead, test."
    
                 -- Bret Pettichord
    

    Need I say more?

    Probably.

    One of the most important tenets of agility (<-- little 'a' ;), in my opinion, is to not overthink. Unless you're …

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  10. Looking for a Django Reader

    I've just finished the last rough draft of a short e-book, An Intro to Testing Web apps with twill and Selenium. The book has four sections:

    1. Introduction
    2. twill intro
    3. Selenium intro
    4. Testing an app with twill and Selenium

    The "app" being tested in #4 is just the very simple poll …

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  11. Strangling Your Code and Growing Your Test Harness: The 9 Phases of Building Automated Tests Into Legacy Code

    I'm in the early throes of building tests into my Cartwheel project. Cartwheel was one of the two projects that inspired my Web testing project, twill, so naturally I'm happy to finally be putting twill to good use in my own projects. Naturally the transition from building tools for building …

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  12. Testing is hard.

    I spent the better part of today refitting Cartwheel for testing. Cartwheel is a bioinformatics framework that is used by a few hundred people; it's mostly a database-backed Web site, with a compute server queueing system tacked on.

    Cartwheel is one of the two sites that got me interested in …

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